Playdough Provocations: Emojis! — The Curious Kindergarten

Are your students interested in emojis? Mine are obsessed! We stumbled upon this interest after setting out some loose parts for the children to explore in the first few weeks of school. One student created a “winking emoji” with his loose parts which, when shared with the class, created an uproar of excited children all […]

via Playdough Provocations: Emojis! — The Curious Kindergarten

Play dough is one of the wondrous materials of childhood. Combining emojis and play dough is brilliant! Young children are in a huge learning time for understanding and recognizing emotions on a cognitive, psychological, and visual level. Plus it’s fun, and a form of literacy that children may have already been exposed to through cell phones and computers. Fine motor skills and creativity are also developed, so I say Bravo to the Curious Kindergarten!

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About francifularts

I am an independent art educator. I had my first experience teaching ceramics when I was 24 and worked in the University for Youth program at the University of Denver. As an elementary school teacher I always found myself integrating the arts across the curriculum, which led to me working as an artist in the schools. In May of 2008 I began a master's program with Lesley University in their Creative Arts in Learning Program. It was a truly transformative and incredible experience which led me to decide to devote the rest of my teaching career to teaching art, and through the arts. About the same time that I completed my master's degree in January of 2011 I was hired to teach art in two different programs. I have never been happier in my work as a teacher, and I really appreciate the wonderful professors and cohort of fellow teachers I studied with at Lesley University. I also want to thank all of the wonderful arts educators that I have met online through the TAB/choice list serv for their thoughtful posts and insightful suggestions for teaching art!
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